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Paramedic vision requirement
#1
Hi guys, hope yes can answer my question. I am currently contemplating a career as a paramedic, however I am colour blind. Does colour blindness rule my out of becoming a paramedic with the HSE or DFB? Thanks.
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#2
Rules you out for DFB as far as I'm aware

All DFB Paramedics are also firefighters and need colour vision

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#3
Was guessing it would for DFB, what about HSE?
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#4
I dont honestly know being honest with you

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#5
Any HSE paramedics on here that might have an idea?
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#6
There is vision tests
More men than women are colour blind, depends on the severity of the issue


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#7
Cheers for the reply, does being colour blind automatically rule you out of becoming a paramedic with the NAS? I understand that there would be some form of vision test, but would this be a no no for gaining employment? What kind of tasks would colour vision have an effect on with in the service. Cheers.
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#8
I am also curious as why a colour vision deficiency would be a bar to employment as a Paramedic. It used not be a bar to joining An Garda Siochana, but it did prevent you from completing a driving course.
The science behind this however is difficult to find. It seems to stem from the suggestion in 1875 that the deceased engineer in a train crash may have been colourblind, however there was no evidence to support this.
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#9
i dont think it stops you doing the driving course anymore
Those who can, do.

Those who can't do, teach.

Those who can't do or teach....... Manage!
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#10
Being colour blind definitely excludes you from The Defence Forces. Lad in work has a son that was turned down on that basis. He starts in Sandhurst military college on a 2 year officer training programme for The B.A. next month
We trained hard ... but it seemed that every time we were beginning to form up into teams we would be reorganized. I was to learn later in life that we tend to meet any new situation by reorganizing; and a wonderful method it can be for creating the illusion of progress while producing confusion, inefficiency, and demoralization.
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#11
(27-09-2016, 08:02 PM)Medicparawb Wrote: Cheers for the reply, does being colour blind automatically rule you out of becoming a paramedic with the NAS? I understand that there would be some form of vision test, but would this be a no no for gaining employment? What kind of tasks would colour vision have an effect on with in the service. Cheers.


Color blindness if profound could have a dangerous aspect if you are using colour coding on drugs as a recognition method. Before anyone says you need to read and check the name etc, that's the correct and proper procedure but I ask anyone whom hasn't taken an ampoule into hand from looking at the colouring on it and using that as the way they selected it from a bag.

Cannulas and some other pieces of equipment are colour coded to sizes etc but again should be written on the item and colour alone is not a method for checking or utilising stuff.

Traffic, if you have a red/green deficiency then driving could be an issue for lights from a distance but we all know red is at the top and green at the bottom.


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#12
(04-10-2016, 04:26 PM)Actual Paramedic Wrote:
(27-09-2016, 08:02 PM)Medicparawb Wrote: Cheers for the reply, does being colour blind automatically rule you out of becoming a paramedic with the NAS? I understand that there would be some form of vision test, but would this be a no no for gaining employment? What kind of tasks would colour vision have an effect on with in the service. Cheers.


Color blindness if profound could have a dangerous aspect if you are using colour coding on drugs as a recognition method. Before anyone says you need to read and check the name etc, that's the correct and proper procedure but I ask anyone whom hasn't taken an ampoule into hand from looking at the colouring on it and using that as the way they selected it from a bag.

Cannulas and some other pieces of equipment are colour coded to sizes etc but again should be written on the item and colour alone is not a method for checking or utilising stuff.

Traffic, if you have a red/green deficiency then driving could be an issue for lights from a distance but we all know red is at the top and green at the bottom.


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I'm afraid the last point is a myth.
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#13
All the traffic lights I ever seen had red at the top and green at the bottom  22
We trained hard ... but it seemed that every time we were beginning to form up into teams we would be reorganized. I was to learn later in life that we tend to meet any new situation by reorganizing; and a wonderful method it can be for creating the illusion of progress while producing confusion, inefficiency, and demoralization.
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#14
My point was those with red/green deficiency would struggle to tell the difference between red and green traffic lights. This is nonsense. There is no medical evidence to support it, even if it is regularly used as an excuse by those who run red lights. They look completely different. Green looks like white, red looks like red.
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