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Public use of hydrants
#1
Quick question

Ive noticed recently 3 or 4 times drain cleaning companies filling up their water tanks from the hydrant outside the apartment block. But haven't seen them working in the area

Wasnt an issue til one fella left the cover off and buggered off. Had to go myself and replace it

Just wondering if anyone can use a hydrant for personal or commercial purposes or is it restricted to authorised users like fire brigade

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#2
Road work crews regularly use them aswell
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#3
Fire Services Act 1981 says the following:

S.29

Public water supply for fire-fighting.
29.—(1) The functions of a sanitary authority for the provision of a supply of water shall extend to the supply of water for fire-fighting purposes and the provision and maintenance of fire hydrants at such places as the fire authority requires.


(2) Where a fire authority represents to a sanitary authority that reasonable provision has not been made for a supply of water for fire-fighting purposes, the sanitary authority shall consult with the fire authority as to the measures required and shall take such measures as may be agreed.


S. 31

Damage to fire hydrant.
31.—Any person who interferes with, damages or obstructs a fire hydrant or any apparatus for drawing water from a main for the purpose of fire-fighting otherwise than in connection with operations of a fire brigade or for any purpose authorised by the sanitary authority shall be guilty of an offence.



There shouldnt be an issue with Council Staff using a hydrant as they are members of the Sanitary Authority/Local Authority. However, I dont think private contractors should be using them unless they have permission from the Fire Authority or Irish Water. After all, all commercial premises have a water meter fitted and are charged on their water use, using hydrants to top up saves them the cost of filling ICB's, tanks or whatever. Leaving the cover off could be deemed as interfering with a hydrant and if Joe Soap fell into an open hydrant pit in the dark, you can be damn sure the Local Authority would be the ones who would be sued.
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#4
Local authority water bye-laws also restrict the use of water from hydrants, and doing so is also an offence under those - you basically have to get a standpipe licence to take water from a hydrant (and pay for the water).

http://www.kildare.ie/CountyCouncil/Wate...ingSystem/

http://www.laois.ie/media/Media,2084,en.pdf
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#5
(11-11-2016, 03:40 PM)Command Support Wrote: Fire Services Act 1981 says the following:

S.29

Public water supply for fire-fighting.
29.—(1) The functions of a sanitary authority for the provision of a supply of water shall extend to the supply of water for fire-fighting purposes and the provision and maintenance of fire hydrants at such places as the fire authority requires.


(2) Where a fire authority represents to a sanitary authority that reasonable provision has not been made for a supply of water for fire-fighting purposes, the sanitary authority shall consult with the fire authority as to the measures required and shall take such measures as may be agreed.


S. 31

Damage to fire hydrant.
31.—Any person who interferes with, damages or obstructs a fire hydrant or any apparatus for drawing water from a main for the purpose of fire-fighting otherwise than in connection with operations of a fire brigade or for any purpose authorised by the sanitary authority shall be guilty of an offence.



There shouldnt be an issue with Council Staff using a hydrant as they are members of the Sanitary Authority/Local Authority. However, I dont think private contractors should be using them unless they have permission from the Fire Authority or Irish Water. After all, all commercial premises have a water meter fitted and are charged on their water use, using hydrants to top up saves them the cost of filling ICB's, tanks or whatever. Leaving the cover off could be deemed as interfering with a hydrant and if Joe Soap fell into an open hydrant pit in the dark, you can be damn sure the Local Authority would be the ones who would be sued.
Thats kind of what I was thinking


They come right down the end of an apartment block into a cul de sac to do it


Out of sight on purpose maybe??


By pure coincidence the company employed by management company for fire safety were round flusing and testing the hydrants about 20 mins ago

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#6
Pretty much, and most people wouldn't have a bulls notion who can or can't use a hydrant.  People will always take the chance if they can get away with it. Of course they could end up damaging threads or the like also, or taking the false spindle away which create problems if theres a fire in the vicinity.
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#7
Ill keep an eye out

If theyre back Ill have a word

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#8
The best case of this iv seen was a mobile window and gutter cleaning service who were connecting their pressure washer hose direct to the hydrant and using what pressure they got from source to clean.
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#9
Drain cleaning company down here regularly does it. And why when you seen the hydrant left open did you not fall into the open pit


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#10
(11-11-2016, 10:29 PM)Blackbolt Wrote: Drain cleaning company down here regularly does it. And why when you seen the hydrant left open did you not fall into the open pit


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I have somewhere to be in February.

A doctor needs to pass me fit in 2 weeks time

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#11
Oh I see, your going to be one of those firefighters with an excuse for everything


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#12
(12-11-2016, 10:24 AM)Blackbolt Wrote: Oh I see, your going to be one of those firefighters with an excuse for everything


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Well I have to get to be a firefighter first....thats the problem ha ha

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#13
What's the failure rate in firefighter training?


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#14
(12-11-2016, 11:43 AM)Actual Paramedic Wrote: What's the failure rate in firefighter training?


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Ive no idea to be honest

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#15
Maybe some of the lads on here whom conduct training for their local fire service may know


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#16
To be honest it differs from county to county and the opinions of the instructors involved so you wont get an overall answer. What could be considered a fail in one county may not be in another county where the instructors go the extra mile with a weak trainee to get them through. There are a few red flags which would be an immediate non sutability outcome  everyone uses. For years Kerry was considered one of the most difficult in the Country to get through. I know in my own basic and BA many moons ago four did not make it out of the class.

Further discussion can be held in the LR if required and we will get @Brigade and @the gap in on it.
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