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On This Day
#1
February 26th 1960.
Alitalia DC-7 crashes in Newmarket-on-Fergus. 34 fatalities, no cause ever established.

http://streaming.britishpathe.com/hls-vo...9.mp4.m3u8
The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are filled with doubts while the stupid people are full of confidence...
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#2
what player can open that file?
Those who can, do.

Those who can't do, teach.

Those who can't do or teach....... Manage!
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#3
Em, I don't Know!!
That's just a link from safari on the iPhone?
Google british paths and Alitalia crash shannon
The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are filled with doubts while the stupid people are full of confidence...
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#4
There's 2 more videos of Shannon crashes there. One in 1961 and another one in the 50's, both into the estuary.
We are the willing, led by the unknowning, doing the impossible, for the ungrateful.
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#5
One crashed just east of the main runway. Quite tragic. Do Shannon Airport fire & rescue have a hovercraft? Because if another aircraft fell sort of the main runway from the west there is no other way to get to them.
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#6
Not anymore.
They have had had a number of different craft for mud rescue over the years, the last being the hovercraft which has been withdrawn along with the rescue launch.
Due to a change in ARFF requirements, the airport is no longer responsible for aircraft crashes occurring in the river or mud flats areas.
Responsibility for responding to an incident on the estuary area appears to be kicked between various different departments- marine, transport, and environment with none particularly interested.
There are a number of canoes and a large inflatable banana available in the local youth club according to the Major Emergency Plan if anything happens....
The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are filled with doubts while the stupid people are full of confidence...
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#7
Just tried a whole host of media players, none work for that vid
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#8
Another air crash.
Forty years ago today, KLM B747 collided with Pan Am B747 at Los Rodeos Airport Tenerife, killing 583 people, the worst aviation disaster ever.
Ironically, the accident occurred due to terrorist activity at Las Palmas airport resulting in diversions to Tenerife and the Pan Am 747 had the dubious record of being the first 747 ever to be hijacked.
The KLM captain commenced takeoff without permission and collided in fog with the Pan Am who was taxiing clear of the runway.
The following year, I flew on my first flight and my first foreign holiday and landed at Tenerife and the wreckage and burn marks were still visible .
The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are filled with doubts while the stupid people are full of confidence...
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#9
(28-02-2017, 01:36 PM)Tripline Wrote: Just tried a whole host of media players, none work for that vid

Try this link???

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/shannon-air-crash
The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are filled with doubts while the stupid people are full of confidence...
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#10
On this day in 1972 a fire in Noyeks of Parnell St, Dublin claimed the lives of 8 people.
We trained hard ... but it seemed that every time we were beginning to form up into teams we would be reorganized. I was to learn later in life that we tend to meet any new situation by reorganizing; and a wonderful method it can be for creating the illusion of progress while producing confusion, inefficiency, and demoralization.
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#11
What was the building used for? Was it a shop?
The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are filled with doubts while the stupid people are full of confidence...
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#12
(28-03-2017, 08:09 AM)Brigade Wrote: What was the building used for? Was it a shop?

Builders providers. Look it up online.
http://www.esforum.org - Home of the real emergency service personnel.

http://www.facebook.com/emergencysf
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#13
Full of timber, glues, paint and varnish, they used paraffin heaters to heat the office.
We trained hard ... but it seemed that every time we were beginning to form up into teams we would be reorganized. I was to learn later in life that we tend to meet any new situation by reorganizing; and a wonderful method it can be for creating the illusion of progress while producing confusion, inefficiency, and demoralization.
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#14
It's still an empty spot isn't it?
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#15
Worsley Hotel Fire London Dec 13 1974. Red Watch a Brilliant book if anyone gets to lay their hands on it, tells the story of the fire and the crew that responded.


On Dec. 13, 1974, an arson fire swept the Worsley Hotel in the Maida Vale section of London, killing 7 people - including a probationary firefighter named Hamish ``Harry'' Petit.

Three other firefighters were injured.

The story of the Worsley Hotel fire was recorded by journalist Gordon Honeycombe in the book ``Red Watch'' and by former London officer Neil Wallington in the book "Fireman! A personal account."

The hotel's kitchen porter, Edward Mansfield, was convicted of setting the fire.

According to Wikipedia:

The first of several 999 calls were made to the London Fire Brigade at 03:32 and received by the local fire station, A21, Paddington who were ordered to the scene along with neighbouring A22, Manchester Square and G26 Belsize, bringing the first attendance of 4 pumping appliances – 2 carrying the heavy but stable 50 foot (15m) wheeled escape ladders, a 100 ft (30m) turntable ladder (aerial) and an emergency tender (for the breathing apparatus (BA) sets carried, the wearing of which was then still a specialist skill).

On arrival, a chaotic scene greeted the senior officer, a serious fire in progress and numerous persons requiring rescue.

A priority message was made to control and a “Make pumps 8” message was sent (requesting a further 4 pumping appliances in addition to the original 4) within minutes of first arriving, whilst rescues (the priority) were being affected from both the front and rear of the building.

Further reinforcements were requested, first to 15 pumps, and then 20, and finally 30 with a further 2 turntable ladders requested.

During the next hour, the building structure began to deteriorate as floors and roof structures became affected by fire.

This was particularly apparent in house numbers 13, 15, and 17, the worst affected.

Many of the internal stairways were stone and when heated by the fire and then suddenly cooled by water collapsed making internal movement through the building awkward and potentially hazardous.

As further crews arrived along with increasingly senior officers to direct operations and persons were accounted for, the operation moved from rescue to the fighting of the fire.

Crews took hoses through the doors from the street and off ladders through the windows.

One of these fire fighting crews made up of 3 men and a Station Officer, entered a second floor room to search out the seat of the fire.

Whilst in the room, several floors above weakened by the extra load of the partially collapsed roof came down on the crew, the devastation seemingly concentrated on that one room.

The release of the trapped men became the priority, with what proved to be a difficult and protracted rescue operation.

One by one, 3 men were released (2 with serious burns and 1 with a serious back injury) before the body of the 4th man was found, who was declared dead at the scene.
The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are filled with doubts while the stupid people are full of confidence...
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