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Dr John Hinds RIP
#1
John came off his motorbike on Friday 3rd July and died the following days from his injuries.  I didn't know him, met him briefly once or twice at various events but I'd listened to him speak a few times and it's fair to say that he left a lasting impression.  Some of my friends, would have called him a good friend.  There's been a lot of stuff written about him by various people around the world.

John was a consultant anaesthetist and intensive care doctor in Craigavon.  It's probably fair to say that John ran a very tight unit which punched well above it's weight in terms of resources and level of care provided.  He loved motorbikes and was race doctor for the various road races around the country.  John would follow behind the pack so when a rider came off, John was at their side in seconds.  He epitomised bring critical care to the roadside.  For a traumatic cardiac arrest everyone got their long bone fractures pulled out, a pelvic binder and opened both chest cavities.

He was also a fabulous teacher.  He was just back from talking a SMACC Chicago (Social Media and Critical Care).  SMACC is an international conference which will be held in Dublin in 2016.  He coined the hashtag #resuswankers, which has often been misquoted since his death as #DeathisaWanker.

If you want to watch John in action you can see him talk at
SMACC Gold 2014:  Cricolol 

SMACC Chicago 2015:  Crack the Chest: Get Crucified
The key learning points are words to live by
[*]Prepare. Know the evidence.
[*]Make your intentions honourable.
[*]Do it.
[*]Seek out the skeptics.
[*]Never allow a wanker to bring you down.


There are innumerable tributes to John written by
Andy Neill: Emergency Medicine Ireland
Scott Weingart: EMCrit.org
Cliff Reid: Resus.Me
David Menzies: MCI Medical Team
Which are all quite inspiring.

"Lets be the best at this."

People are being asked to support John's dream of a HEMS service for Northern Ireland by signing the petition.  The dream is that his callsign Delta-7 will be reactivated then.
Email: echo59@esforum.org            PGP key: AF7C8C3B
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#2
I knew John, he had some very close friends and I wouldn't say I was one. He kept his friends few and close. He was quiet, guarded and shy. As @Echo59 said above he was a magnificent speaker, medic, rider and gentleman.

He had a different mindset regarding medicine in that he did what was best for the patient and as Janette his partner said he would prefer to "seek forgiveness than look for permission"

I can honestly say I have seen him save lives on the roadside at the motorbike races, he also tried to save many many more and didn't succeed however the patients go the best possible chance and probably could only have been bettered if they crashed into a theatre table in a major trauma hospital

He was progressive is his thinking of trauma and again would be slight against the norm in terms of some techniques with patients. (He would prefer for riders to take off their own helmets rather than the team)

When he spoke people listened and he could explain his thoughts, ideas and rational in a plain simple explanation unlike many other medics.

His sense of humour was dry but sharp and dead pan. He would make fun of himself and his own profession as much as he could

At times I needed help he was only too willing to assist and give ideas. I was honoured to know him, he was an idol of mine as a medical profession but I was also in awe of him as a man
The man who never made a mistake never made anything!
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