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Use of Blue lights on duty
#1
Is there rules and regulations for all voluntary first aid and ambulance services regarding the use of blue light while eg following a bike run and not attending a call. I taught there was heavy rule for blues on the road when there's no need form them. I won't mention any organisation but just wondering as to what the rules and regulations are?
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#2
The use of Blue lights and who can have them is governed by the Road Traffic Act. Phecc registered ambulance services can have blue lights on their vehicles. The use of which would be as required by the circumstances, either as dictated my their management or at the discretion of the driver. It is the drivers responsibility to prove that the use of the lights was deemed necessary due to the circumstances.

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#3
In around 28 years, I can recall using blues on a public road no more than 10ish times.... Huge responsibility for both the driver and the OiC.
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#4
Road Traffic Act 1961 plus amendments


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#5
Iv seen certain organisations use blue lights and sometimes green lights when in convoys following runners or cyclists. These ambulances were not the last in the convoy. I think it looks bad for thos organisation who are seen to be driving around on blues and greens for no emergency reason.
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#6
if first or last vehicle in a cycle or running event yeah its up to the driver but should be okay, usually there will be some form of garda involvement in the event so I just chat to them see what they wish for us to do
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#7
(26-10-2015, 11:09 AM)Jamie21 Wrote: Iv seen certain organisations use blue lights and sometimes green lights when in convoys following runners or cyclists. These ambulances were not the last in the convoy. I think it looks bad for thos organisation who are seen to be driving around on blues and greens for no emergency reason.

Having done many of these cycles, I usually cruise along with the hazards on in that situation.  I'm not the AGS.  It's for them to control traffic.  Blues have no place unless it's an emergency situation. 

Incidentally the last time I had to use the blue lights was one of these cycles. But that's besides the point and their use was warranted.
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#8
It's a pity use of blue lights among organisations is such a taboo subject- no-one ever talks about it...
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#9
(26-10-2015, 11:09 AM)Jamie21 Wrote: Iv seen certain organisations use blue lights and sometimes green lights when in convoys following runners or cyclists. These ambulances were not the last in the convoy. I think it looks bad for thos organisation who are seen to be driving around on blues and greens for no emergency reason.
Green lights? I've not seen anybody with green lights on.... but I'd imagine that it would be a steward or something. Now that said there is no legal entitlement for green lights for anybody. The only flashing lights are amber or blue.

I agree that amber hazard lights are perhaps more appropriate to make the start or end of a cycle/run convoy. That said there is really no harm in it unless people are claiming or trying to claim any exemption under the RTA when it isn't required.... but the simple thing of having the lights on while following a cycle is not a great problem as I see it

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#10
Only green lights I have seen is the dead person ambo and DDoc


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#11
I wouldnt have any major problem with a convoy using the blue light if all they are doing is warning other traffic of a large number of slow moving vehicles, etc.

That of course assumes the lights have been fitted because they are genuinely required from time to time, otherwise just use amber
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#12
You'd think these things would speak for themselves but apparently a lot of people don't seem to understand that blue lights = emergency. 
Driving behind/infront of a cycle is not an emergency. A fractured arm is not an emergency... You get my point. But there seems to be a lot of cowboys who get overly excited when they're given the keys to an ambulance. I know a couple of these people and they do it far too often. I recall one occasion where a particular person flagged down a garda car and asked for an escort, for a stable not life threatening emergency....and the gardai obliged too!
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#13
Used blues at the rear of a cycle (driving an ambulance) on countless occasions. And I shall do it again. If it stops some tool driving into the back of me, I don't care what people think.

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#14
(26-10-2015, 09:39 PM)Scuba Wrote: Used blues at the rear of a cycle (driving an ambulance) on countless occasions. And I shall do it again. If it stops some tool driving into the back of me, I don't care what people think.

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I have to agree that blues are probably the most obvious warning device when behind/in front of a cycle

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#15
I agree with scuba and coastguardsteve......if it saves a collision then that'll do me.
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#16
(26-10-2015, 04:31 PM)sprinter22 Wrote: You'd think these things would speak for themselves but apparently a lot of people don't seem to understand that blue lights = emergency. 
Driving behind/infront of a cycle is not an emergency. A fractured arm is not an emergency... You get my point. But there seems to be a lot of cowboys who get overly excited when they're given the keys to an ambulance. I know a couple of these people and they do it far too often. I recall one occasion where a particular person flagged down a garda car and asked for an escort, for a stable not life threatening emergency....and the gardai obliged too!

I don't agree.
Blue lights on a vehicle are commonly used as a visual warning that a hazard exists. Their use is not limited to emergency situations.
If it was they wouldn't be used at checkpoints....
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#17
(26-10-2015, 04:31 PM)sprinter22 Wrote: You'd think these things would speak for themselves but apparently a lot of people don't seem to understand that blue lights = emergency. 
Driving behind/infront of a cycle is not an emergency. A fractured arm is not an emergency... You get my point. But there seems to be a lot of cowboys who get overly excited when they're given the keys to an ambulance. I know a couple of these people and they do it far too often. I recall one occasion where a particular person flagged down a garda car and asked for an escort, for a stable not life threatening emergency....and the gardai obliged too!

I agree if people see ambulance organisation on blues all the time when are they to know if it's an emergency or not. If they are at the back get a Amber becon like LAS or DAA Fire service R2
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#18
Ah but ambulances are not allowed us an amber becon
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#19
(26-10-2015, 11:53 PM)Jamie21 Wrote:
(26-10-2015, 04:31 PM)sprinter22 Wrote: You'd think these things would speak for themselves but apparently a lot of people don't seem to understand that blue lights = emergency. 
Driving behind/infront of a cycle is not an emergency. A fractured arm is not an emergency... You get my point. But there seems to be a lot of cowboys who get overly excited when they're given the keys to an ambulance. I know a couple of these people and they do it far too often. I recall one occasion where a particular person flagged down a garda car and asked for an escort, for a stable not life threatening emergency....and the gardai obliged too!

I agree if people see ambulance organisation on blues all the time when are they to know if it's an emergency or not. If they are at the back get a Amber becon like LAS or DAA Fire service R2
Those orange beacons are only for use airside at an Airport and as @vidar states are illegal for use on public roads under the Road Traffic Act.


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#20
I assure you, if I'm responding somewhere as opposed to sitting at the back of a cycle, there will be no ambiguity about what I am doing.

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