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Its that time of year again, when we are getting ready for Christmas, family and Santa. Sadly not everyone will be looking forward with anticipation, instead simple hoping for food, warmth or a small present. Thankfully there are goups like 'Little Blue Heroes' and 'Barnados' out there. Both help the youngest and most vulnerable in society and this Christmas we ask that you join us in making a donation at https://www.littleblueheroes.org/donate/ or https://www.barnardos.ie/christmas


Mass Casualty Incident Exercise
#1
Looks like a good show

http://www.dublincivildefence.com/news-a...y-exercise
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#2
Looks like a good one alright.....  Still boggles the mind(I know cost etc,  but there is a cost to doing business)  why the full time services don't drill these scenarios....  I know the only time we get to do a major incident excercise it's in training,  and then nothing until you might face it for real.
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#3
Very little expense for vols as they don't have to pay anyone. Whilst it's an interesting training exercise it's not realistic that a voluntary agency will arrive anytime within the first 60 mins of a major incident. As Coastguard Steve has said it's the full time agencies that need to practice, however asThe NAS are to the pin of their collar just trying to cope with the daily call volume it's unlikely we'll see any major incident exercises any time soon.
We trained hard ... but it seemed that every time we were beginning to form up into teams we would be reorganized. I was to learn later in life that we tend to meet any new situation by reorganizing; and a wonderful method it can be for creating the illusion of progress while producing confusion, inefficiency, and demoralization.
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#4
The scenario had all of the emergency services dealing with other incidents when this accident occurred.

Good day, but hard work!


(10-04-2016, 07:34 PM)The Gap Wrote: Very little expense for vols as they don't have to pay anyone. Whilst it's an interesting training exercise it's not realistic that a voluntary agency will arrive anytime within the first 60 mins of a major incident. As Coastguard Steve has said it's the full time agencies that need to practice, however asThe NAS are to the pin of their collar just trying to cope with the daily call volume it's unlikely we'll see any major incident exercises any time soon.
The best gift you can give to someone is your time, because you are giving them something you can never get back.
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#5
Out of interest, if it was an actual train crash would it be likely that there would be fumes building up in the tunnel? Would crews go in wearing BA gear or would there be adequate ventilation? Do DFB/NAS have access to a rail vehicle for transporting crews/equipment considering the length of the tunnel? Or any part of the railway which wouldn't have easy vehicle access?
http://www.esforum.org - Home of the real emergency service personnel.

http://www.facebook.com/emergencysf
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#6
its an interesting training exercise but as gap says not what the vols will be doing. Last one we ran we did a crowd surge in a stadium we cover regularly, it something we could face so we had to see how we deal with it, we learned a few good leasons from it too
Those who can, do.

Those who can't do, teach.

Those who can't do or teach....... Manage!
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#7
First crews in would be fire to assess the situation and put whatever control measures neccesary into place. The initial recce crew would have to be equipped with BA and gas monitoring equipment at the very least. Rail access will depend on what the track and scene is like. We like to eliminate any moving vehicles due to risk of them hitting survivors. Rail transport would be brought in after the walking wounded are cleared out and control has been firmly established
We trained hard ... but it seemed that every time we were beginning to form up into teams we would be reorganized. I was to learn later in life that we tend to meet any new situation by reorganizing; and a wonderful method it can be for creating the illusion of progress while producing confusion, inefficiency, and demoralization.
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#8
Interesting!  @thegap would the DFB have large ventilation Fans to set up an Air circulation in the tunnel for people working there?  As a member of a vol organisation,  I know it's important for their members to do things like this to keep the interest up,  but perhaps something more likely would be better,  like an incident at a stadium or something?  I'd imagine if there was a major Incident there would be staff brought in to cover the extra work and that the Vols might run the transport from scene to hospital or set up a field hospital.  I know down here,  the Vols have been trained up in decontamination to do that so paramedics can treat people instead of wash them.
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#9
DFB wouldn't have anything big enough to ventilate an area that large.. You'd be talking about truck mounted fans for that incident type. I know in other brigades they have a recall system for staff but that's not the case in DFB. You have to remember we could put 50 people at an incident and still have half our personell left to do the other work. Our issue would be ambulances and medical equipment, and that's NAS brief in a major incident.
We trained hard ... but it seemed that every time we were beginning to form up into teams we would be reorganized. I was to learn later in life that we tend to meet any new situation by reorganizing; and a wonderful method it can be for creating the illusion of progress while producing confusion, inefficiency, and demoralization.
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