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Blood bikes
#21
(27-01-2014, 10:52 PM)Blue Light Wrote: I was doing a speed check on motorway last month and I see a motorbike in distance appraoching with blues on, as bike got closer off with the blues and speed reduced.

I'd have suspected you would have had a chat with them???
The man who never made a mistake never made anything!
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#22
I would have if he was significantly over the limit with no reasonable excuse
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#23
fair play to them I say

We need people of action and en-devour in this country and this blood bike initiative seems to tick both boxes
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#24
(27-01-2014, 05:05 PM)vidar Wrote:
(27-01-2014, 01:07 AM)Clio Wrote:
(11-12-2012, 11:12 AM)Florence_N Wrote: I saw on local newspapers that Blood Bike West was launched in November and from a Google search there seems to be a Blood Bike East Blood Bike South West and Blood Bike North West also being set up.
Seems a great service to offer on a voluntary basis 19


There are another two groups up and running now see below for details

Bloodbikeleinster Covering Mid Leinster area

Norteastbloodbikes Covering Monaghan Cavan Drogheda

Would it not make more sense to just have one group a blood bikes ireland instead of each group doing it's own fundraising and trying to arrange locally with HSE calls etc


Its the way its set up in the Uk all groups are independent of each other, but in the uk they have a National Blood Bike Association which gets the larger corporate donations, which in turn are distributed between the groups affiliated to it, while some groups operate in Ireland a full service others only operate after hours, this is the way it has been in the uk as well since the 1960s
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#25
(27-01-2014, 10:52 PM)Blue Light Wrote: I was doing a speed check on motorway last month and I see a motorbike in distance appraoching with blues on, as bike got closer off with the blues and speed reduced.

You should have got the reg, most blood bike groups have strict policies in the use of blues, members have become ex members as a result of improper use.
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#26
(29-01-2014, 10:16 PM)cryan Wrote:
(27-01-2014, 10:52 PM)Blue Light Wrote: I was doing a speed check on motorway last month and I see a motorbike in distance appraoching with blues on, as bike got closer off with the blues and speed reduced.

You should have got the reg, most blood bike groups have strict policies in the use of blues, members have become ex members as a result of improper use.

I think you will find that the onus is on the rider to make the call most volunteers dont need to use blues in the evening time as there is little or no traffic on the roads, in the daytime you will find that is a totally different scenario, the use of lights help make steady progress while maintaining a safety aspect as well, you are of course still constricted to the road traffic laws, that is another reason that Blood Bike riders should be trained to the highest civilian standard which is RoSPA Silver or Gold ( Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents ) which is what a Garda motorcyclists standard is, most Blood bike groups insist on this standard and should be adhered to for safety, of both rider, pedestrians and other road users.
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#27
(29-01-2014, 10:52 PM)Clio Wrote:
(29-01-2014, 10:16 PM)cryan Wrote:
(27-01-2014, 10:52 PM)Blue Light Wrote: I was doing a speed check on motorway last month and I see a motorbike in distance appraoching with blues on, as bike got closer off with the blues and speed reduced.

You should have got the reg, most blood bike groups have strict policies in the use of blues, members have become ex members as a result of improper use.

I think you will find that the onus is on the rider to make the call most volunteers dont need to use blues in the evening time as there is little or no traffic on the roads, in the daytime you will find that is a totally different scenario, the use of lights help make steady progress while maintaining a safety aspect as well, you are of course still constricted to the road traffic laws, that is another reason that Blood Bike riders should be trained to the highest civilian standard which is RoSPA Silver or Gold ( Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents ) which is what a Garda motorcyclists standard is, most Blood bike groups insist on this standard and should be adhered to for safety, of both rider, pedestrians and other road users.

As a RoSPA gold rider myself I agree on the standard. However, I am not trained in the use of blues, while I have a legal right to use them(although with no road traffic act exceptions) I chose personally not to unless directed by a gard under escort.The batternberg is enough for me. my group has strict policies on the use of them, although I am aware of a couple of members breaching this policy, but they are not members anymore.

The garda standard aka class one is the gold standard on steroids. Faster, lower fault tolerance and with blues training.

Personally I would like to see an official blues course be made available and have us be held accountable like ambulances to prevent abuse.

Who knows when we have more of the country covered this could happen, not holding my breath though.
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#28
(29-01-2014, 11:10 PM)cryan Wrote: As a RoSPA gold rider myself I agree on the standard. However, I am not trained in the use of blues, while I have a legal right to use them


OK now I am confused. Our lads who have not done EFAD are allowed to drive our Jeeps but under no circumstances are they allowed to turn the blues on. How come that Blood Bikes are allowed to use Blues and not be trained to drive while using them?
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#29
It's the same as voluntary organisations ambulances. Very few people, if any are trained in the use of blue lights but still use them when necessary.

I know of a few in my own organisation that assume it's fair game to blue light it to hospital with any injury. And for some strange reason some of them insist on having the hazard lights on with the blue so they can be seen.......
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#30
(29-01-2014, 11:34 PM)Blackbolt Wrote:
(29-01-2014, 11:10 PM)cryan Wrote: As a RoSPA gold rider myself I agree on the standard. However, I am not trained in the use of blues, while I have a legal right to use them


OK now I am confused. Our lads who have not done EFAD are allowed to drive our Jeeps but under no circumstances are they allowed to turn the blues on. How come that Blood Bikes are allowed to use Blues and not be trained to drive while using them?

Because our vehicles are equipped to carry blood and/or organs. It was in one of the last RTA amendments.

We have no exceptions making the blues pointless on anything other motorways and natational roads.

As for the training, to the best of my knowledge there is not an official state approved course/qualification (I'm open to correction here). AFAIK agencies just do their own internal Training.
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#31
Bloody hell. I never actually realised that there were untrained drivers/riders driving under blues
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#32
(29-01-2014, 11:44 PM)Blackbolt Wrote: Bloody hell. I never actually realised that there were untrained drivers/riders driving under blues


Ahem. (Chiefs permission.) Ahem.
http://www.esforum.org - Home of the real emergency service personnel.

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#33
(30-01-2014, 12:04 AM)foreign Wrote:
(29-01-2014, 11:44 PM)Blackbolt Wrote: Bloody hell. I never actually realised that there were untrained drivers/riders driving under blues


Ahem. (Chiefs permission.) Ahem.


Good point but aren't there a lot of restrictions with that?
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#34
(30-01-2014, 12:08 AM)Blackbolt Wrote:
(30-01-2014, 12:04 AM)foreign Wrote:
(29-01-2014, 11:44 PM)Blackbolt Wrote: Bloody hell. I never actually realised that there were untrained drivers/riders driving under blues


Ahem. (Chiefs permission.) Ahem.


Good point but aren't there a lot of restrictions with that?


Only engine size. Max two litre. And no big vans.
http://www.esforum.org - Home of the real emergency service personnel.

http://www.facebook.com/emergencysf
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#35
Fair enough, would not be allowed in the Brigade though 148
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#36
You've just to be covered under the fleet policy in OMAC/RC and I think it's the same with the SJA. Daft when you think about it, but hopefully the PHECC driving standards improve things.

I've had to tell over eager drivers in the past to slow down and turn off the lights in the past. No consistency in training.
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#37
(29-01-2014, 11:44 PM)Blackbolt Wrote: Bloody hell. I never actually realised that there were untrained drivers/riders driving under blues

We are RoSPA trained/qualified. From what I've heard from someone who looks after the insurance side of things, the HSE bikes only have to meet a grade 2 with their internal bit of blues training on top.

Given the lack of exemptions and rare need for blues, the RoSPA and common sense serve us well enough, until an official course is available.
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#38
Not sure any of the voluntary groups do blue light training. Crazy as some of them are wild to transport with blues for a possible fracture
The man who never made a mistake never made anything!
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#39
(30-01-2014, 02:17 AM)Actual Paramedic Wrote: Not sure any of the voluntary groups do blue light training. Crazy as some of them are wild to transport with blues for a possible fracture


I agree, especially as the patient will probably have a long wait in A&E 22
It boils down to education and an understanding of patient care. Not all drivers are EMTs and therefore may not fully understand that the patient does not need to be rushed to hospital.
Then there is the blue light haze 04

PHECC driving standard - non emergency is 18 hours and advanced driving is 90 hours. There probably needs to by an intermediate course with the focus on safety and blue light driving only in extreme circumstances. This would be more suitable to Vols.

Everyone driving an ambulance should experience travelling at 70km+ on bumpy windy Irish roads lying on the trolley in the back, that'll make them slow down 42
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#40
A good driver will always ask the attendant who should be emt or above.

Do we need to get there quickly or comfortabley. 9/10 blues aren't needed
JUST CALL ME PROBIE
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