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Location of CO detector
#1
Looking for some advice on the location of a CO detector.

We're renting a relatively small 2 story house.  Gas fired central heating.  There is a gas cooker in the kitchen and an open gas fire (we don't use yet) in the sitting room.  Both of these are off the main hall.  The gas boiler is in a tiny utility room off the kitchen.

Our main bedroom is upstairs, above the kitchen.

My question is where would be the best place to place the CO detector?

I'd think in the utility room because i) that is the main source for CO and ii) the room is small and most likely to have the highest concentrations.  However, you'd be less likely to hear the alarm upstairs.  Also, we tend not to have the heating on at night.

Putting the alarm in the kitchen would make it less muffled but it is a bigger room so concentrations would be lower.

Thoughts?
Email: echo59@esforum.org            PGP key: AF7C8C3B
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#2
Have you only 1 detector?
They should be about 4 metres away I think from anything that produces CO but you also need one near enough to hear it.
I got one that interlink and if one sounds they all sound.
Have a look at this; www.carbonmonoxide.ie/.../co_alarms.ht...
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This post has been repped by: echo59 (3),

#3
Putting it in the utility room might also lead to false alarms. I'd be inclined to put it in the kitchen, where it will cover both the utility room and the cooker, and another in the sitting room once you start using the open gas fire.

http://www.carbonmonoxide.ie/htm/co_alarms.htm

http://www.hseni.gov.uk/co_detector_advice.pdf
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This post has been repped by: echo59 (3),

#4
Cheers, lads.

Bought one CO detector in local shop about 2 months ago.  Had been meaning to post this before putting up the detector but got around to doing neither.  We've just recently moved into this house.

Was thinking that the boiler would be the only real CO source.  Thought the hob and open fire wouldn't be major CO sources as they are open to the room so have a plentiful supply of O2.  So I was focusing on the boiler in the utility room.

Funny, the video on Brigade's site is made by EI Electronics.  I worked for them for 2 summers...

Interlinking alarms sounds good.  Might be something to talk to the landlord about.
Email: echo59@esforum.org            PGP key: AF7C8C3B
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#5
Aren't they also supposed to be at about the level of your head because CO is heavier than air so having them high up is useless.
It's not the HSE's opinion, it's not managements opinion, it's mine. All mine.
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#6
 But wouldn't that depend on how tall you are. 22

There are loads of different types of detectors but basically the work by detecting an increase of CO in the air over time . And regardless of COs weight it reacts in air the same way as it does in the body, it essentially robs your oxygen. The detectors recognise that this oxygen is being taken and activate.
So, placement should be according to the type you have bought and manufacturers recommendations for that detector.
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#7
CO is a small bit lighter than air, so in practice air currents in a room have a big influence on where it builds up. Ceiling mounting (away from walls) would be in line with EN standard and manufacturer guidance.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21536403
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#8
Two engineer's........that is all
"I'm not fluent in the language of violence, but I know enough to get by in places where its spoken"

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