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Layperson drug administration
#1




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Quote:He revealed he has signed the necessary legislation allowing these treatments, including glucagon for diabetic hypoglycaemia, epipens for severe allergic reactions and glyceryl trinitrate for severe chest pain, to be given by the public.
The medicines can be kept in stock in schools, sports clubs and other areas frequented by the public, as well as administered by pharmacists.
The decision was welcomed last night by Caroline Sloane, whose daughter Emma (14) died on O'Connell St nearly two years ago after suffering an allergic reaction to peanuts.
The Pre-Hospital Emergency Care Council, which accredits paramedics, will be given the role of accrediting courses for lay people which will be available in coming months.
Mr Varadkar also said that pharmacists can now administer shingles and pneumococcal vaccines. Pneumococcal infection is the most common cause of pneumonia. The move will make the vaccines more accessible to the public and enable them to avoid trips to their GPs.



[url=http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/health/varadkar-to-allow-public-to-give-lifesaving-emergency-medicines-31611471.html]http://SOURCE
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#2
In the news today; http://www.thejournal.ie/medical-emergen...1-Oct2015/

"Trained" lay people to be allowed to give a number of drugs - salbutomol, entonox, glucagon, naloxone, epi, gtn. 

What do people think of this?

I think its a great idea in theory, but very interested in how it will be implemented. I see PHECC are developing some form of training, so it won't really be lay people truly, maybe CFR level course - i.e. a few hours. Since some of these are EMT drugs currently I wonder does this mean upskilling for current CFR/EFR level people, and maybe an expanded range of med's for EMT's soon? Interesting times ahead no doubt!
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#3
Epi pen and narcan yay the rest I'm not sure :/


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#4
We are trained to give, salbutomol, entonox, glucagon, epi, gtn asperin and O² through our crowd, in theory it's a good idea, until Walter arrives on scene who heard on the radio he can give little Jimmy the diabetic his "epi pen" for his allergic reaction to hypoglycemia  49 . 
The less you give a feck, The happier you'll be!!
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#5
Is entonox a life saving medicine?

Also what will the public be taught to measure blood glucose, BP etc? I hope a situation doesn't arise where EFRs/EMTs are restricted but "Joe public can gives lots of meds to lots of people."


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#6
It's a good idea in theory as has been said iv no problem really in one way but will be very interesting to see how it's implemented by phecc the will obviously have to bring in a new level or rejig the levels already in place interesting times ahead for sure

My main worry is I Think some of the reporting has been bit wrong also like it gives the impression anybody can lash drugs into anybody so as also said you will have mr Walter turning up and lashing drugs into anybody unconscious coz the man on the radio said he can


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#7
(16-10-2015, 08:34 AM)Florence_N Wrote: Is entonox a life saving medicine?

Also what will the public be taught to measure blood glucose, BP etc? I hope a situation doesn't arise where EFRs/EMTs are restricted but "Joe public can gives lots of meds to lots of people."


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I would hope so as in anybody giving any drug should have a full set of baseline vitals before they give it if they allow people just to give the drug without checking anything it would be a joke and I doubt phecc would allow that to be fair


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#8
Is entonox a life saving medicine?

Also what will the public be taught to measure blood glucose, BP etc? I hope a situation doesn't arise where EFRs/EMTs are restricted but "Joe public can gives lots of meds to lots of people."


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#9
WexEMT


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[/quote' Wrote:
I would hope so as in anybody giving any drug should have a full set of baseline vitals before they give it if they allow people just to give the drug without checking anything it would be a joke and I doubt phecc would allow that to be fair


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But that would result in a EFR like training course, not a CFR C or similar short training course.

I have no problems with Epi/Narcan single use easily administered medications being available. It will be interesting to see how the availability of other medications will work out.


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#10
(16-10-2015, 09:29 AM)Florence_N Wrote:
WexEMT


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I would hope so as in anybody giving any drug should have a full set of baseline vitals before they give it if they allow people just to give the drug without checking anything it would be a joke and I doubt phecc would allow that to be fair


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[/quote' Wrote: But that would result in a EFR like training course, not a CFR C or similar short training course.

I have no problems with Epi/Narcan single use easily administered medications being available. It will be interesting to see how the availability of other medications will work out.


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Yeah it would like you epi and naloxone iv no problem really with (still need some training) anyting elese will require more I suspect be interesting to see what they come up with


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#11
Not sure what PHECC will have to do with it if it's laypeople as reported. PHECC already have licenced and trained people, they're called CFR/EFR/EMT etc.
This may end up more like OFA run by FETAC and will most likely end up with the farcical situation where joe public can administer narcan but a trained EFR can't
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#12
(16-10-2015, 12:14 PM)999nobody Wrote: Not sure what PHECC will have to do with it if it's laypeople as reported. PHECC already have licenced and trained people, they're called CFR/EFR/EMT etc.
This may end up more like OFA run by FETAC and will most likely end up with the farcical situation where joe public can administer narcan but a trained EFR can't

This is what I can see happening


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#13
Don't bother filling in your PHECC number on the pcr when the med is delivered, if anyone asks it was some bystander that gave it.
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#14
Folks.... relax, nothing is going to change, this just a legislative piece to regularise a situation that is awfully grey.... the idea is that for example, that a diabetic or a child with severe alergies goes to a school , this legislation will allow trained teachers to deliver lifesaving medication in life threatening situations. Prior to this legislation there was a reluctantance by teachers to deliver any medication due to the legal grey area. .... this isn't a carte blanche to deliver medication by Joe public.

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#15
From PHECC;

In response to Minister Varadkars announcement this morning:

The Pre Hospital Emergency Care Council (PHECC) is delighted to support the new laws signed by Minister for Health Leo Varadkar to allow life-saving rescue medicines to be administered by trained members of the public in emergency situations. 

PHECC has been given the role of developing suitable education and training standards and approving recognised institutions to deliver and certify courses for lay people which will be available in coming months. PHECC will now commence this work through the committees of Council and other stakeholders as required. Priority will be given to the medicinal products Naloxone and Adrenaline in 2015. PHECC will provide further updates via Facebook and website.
The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are filled with doubts while the stupid people are full of confidence...
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