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great achievement
#1
http://www.irishmirror.ie/news/irish-new...ar-7342464

well done Dublin ambulance service
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#2
Breaking news....  Ambulance service train's staff to use bandages....  I know it's probably news because of the recent profile around Gunshots,  but it must be a slow news day.  While it is great that they are issuing staff with the haemostatic dressings,  it's hardly news worthy.
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#3
were paramedics not previously trained to stop heavy bleeding or is this just another rag report and shame on anyone that believes it?
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#4
It's a heamostatic dressing. Previously used in battlefield trauma it's now finding it's way into civvy street. When I was in the army everyone had one and that was nearly 30 years ago, so it's not a new concept by any means.
We trained hard ... but it seemed that every time we were beginning to form up into teams we would be reorganized. I was to learn later in life that we tend to meet any new situation by reorganizing; and a wonderful method it can be for creating the illusion of progress while producing confusion, inefficiency, and demoralization.
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#5
Its in the emt cpg's too. Was upskilled on it months back with IN naloxone.....we dont carry it due to cost and the highly unlikely event we'll ever need it
JUST CALL ME PROBIE
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#6
even the vols are trained to use these yokes. it's just a bandage. but as emteabreak said above the vols would never have a reason to use them.
You can even go into the chemist and buy a styptic pencil (which i highy recommend) to use on your shaving cuts. costs about €2 and is the same stuff really. Sometimes we use them in the hospital too for small things.
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#7
NAS were shown them but not signed off by the Medical Director hence we don't have them.
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#8
I love the way PHECC has worked out on stuff like this, national standards - and then you still end up with a mish-mash of who does what, levels of upskilling, cpg adoptions etc.

A standard of care should be exactly that. As for never need them, that's a big statement to make- I was at two separate events covered by vols last year which involved people racing with chainsaws, for example.
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#9
(16-02-2016, 11:22 AM)civdef Wrote: I love the way PHECC has worked out on stuff like this, national standards - and then you still end up with a mish-mash of who does what, levels of upskilling, cpg adoptions etc.

A standard of care should be exactly that. As for never need them, that's a big statement to make- I was at two separate events covered by vols last year which involved people racing with chainsaws, for example.

Racing with chainsaws.....Hilarious! Some country fair no doubt?!
We are the willing, led by the unknowning, doing the impossible, for the ungrateful.
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#10
Forestry fair and the ploughing.

Risk assess this:



or:

[Image: lumberjacks%20crosslogs.jpg]
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#11
(16-02-2016, 11:22 AM)civdef Wrote: I love the way PHECC has worked out on stuff like this, national standards - and then you still end up with a mish-mash of who does what, levels of upskilling, cpg adoptions etc.

A standard of care should be exactly that. As for never need them, that's a big statement to make- I was at two separate events covered by vols last year which involved people racing with chainsaws, for example.

If NAS arent carrying them you can hardly expect a vol org to do so???

€30 for a 10x10 dressing with a quite short shelf life....thats half tank of juice for the ambo...2 shirts for a member etc

I appreciate what your saying and maybe Ive got my Dublin head on but itd be wound pads and thick dressings an early request for ALS and a bolus of diesel should I be dealing with a haemorrhage that catastrophic
JUST CALL ME PROBIE
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#12
The question has to be asked, if PHECC decide it's a national standard of care, why aren't they?

The shelf life isn't as short as all that (typically 2-3 years), and you would only need a few on an ambulance, so in my opinion it's being mostly used as an excuse.

IMO the situation is worse at vol EMT level, at least higher grades have access to other haemorrhage control options, i.e. indirect pressure and tourniquets.

Yes, life threatening bleeding is a  rare situation, but not unforseeable (can think of a couple of instances locally with farm accidents offhand), and the costs aren't prohibitive compared to other items carried.
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#13
(16-02-2016, 03:47 PM)civdef Wrote: The question has to be asked, if PHECC decide it's a national standard of care, why aren't they?

The shelf life isn't as short as all that (typically 2-3 years), and you would only need a few on an ambulance, so in my opinion it's being mostly used as an excuse.

IMO the situation is worse at vol EMT level, at least higher grades have access to other haemorrhage control options, i.e. indirect pressure and tourniquets.

Yes, life threatening bleeding is a  rare situation, but not unforseeable (can think of a couple of instances locally with farm accidents offhand), and the costs aren't prohibitive compared to other items carried.

It's pheccs job to push the standard all the time... Cost v benefits is something that each service must weigh up.  They are a national regulator, that must cover all of services.   it is then up to each service to implement the standard as their medical director sees fit.  I  believe there are more than just this that have been different between services.  If I recall correctly,  DFB weren't or aren't able to cease resuscitation or was it only AP?  But NAS can as per CPG.  Or certain routes for meds are only AP but phecc say paramedic can also admin via that route.  
I agree tourniquet should be in for emt and probably will be.
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#14
"If I recall correctly,  DFB weren't or aren't able to cease resuscitation"

absolute rubbish!!!!!
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#15
I stand corrected....  I'm not sure where I got that idea from...  I was of the understanding that it was the case that only APs could cease resus and clear c spine in DFB.  But I'm glad to hear that isn't the case.  Thanks for the clarification.
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#16
Ok I have been reading this thread. Is this heamostop? as in the powder in the brown wrapping that has been sitting in one of our old first aids kits for the past twenty years?
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#17
We have haemostatic bandages on every appliance carrying a chainsaw. Was told it was a basic requirement .....
The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are filled with doubts while the stupid people are full of confidence...
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#18
(17-02-2016, 10:22 PM)Blackbolt Wrote: Ok I have been reading this thread. Is this heamostop? as in the powder in the brown wrapping that has been sitting in one of our old first aids kits for the past twenty years?

Same principle but impregnated into the bandages.  It's slightly different than what you probably have but it's the same idea  

Its a  great idea to have it on the appliance for the chainsaws.  Do ye carry tourniquets @brigade?
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#19
Nope.
But no shortage of rope....
The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are filled with doubts while the stupid people are full of confidence...
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#20
(17-02-2016, 11:56 PM)Brigade Wrote: We have haemostatic bandages on every appliance carrying a chainsaw. Was told it was a basic requirement .....

If yis would buy decent chainsaw gear (like ours) ye wouldnt need to carry them 22
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